Archive for May, 2010

The Benefits of Senior Home Care in San Diego, California

Here is a great article about the many benefits of home care for an aging senior.  For help with an aging loved one in the San Diego CA area, visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com.

Senior Home Care Services Has Many Benefits Over a Nursing Home

By Chuck Parsens

As the United States people age, the focus on the number of looked for services will have to line up with the quality of the care rendered. For many years a spotlight has been placed on how well residents who reside in a nursing home are treated. Some understand that the level of care an individual obtains is dependent on how much family members are involved. Some mature children have trouble with placing their senior parents in a nursing home because of the negative press. Price is also a part in making this choice. An alternative to nursing homes is senior home care services, which allow a person to stay put in their home and receive the level of care that they will need.

Along with determining the price and care, the types of elderly home care services are chosen based on an individual’s situation. Insurance companies have sought ways to trim down the costs of hospitalization and therapy services, which has opened the door for service providers who concentrate in giving these services at an individual’s home. This reduces health care costs and allows an older adult to remain in their homes. The home care landscape has grown into a cutthroat business, giving greater options for people to choose from.

The advantages of having home care services rather than staying in a nursing home cannot be miscalculated. The intellectual portion of being able to keep some level of liberty can go a long way to improving the excellence of life for numerous elder adults. Most elderly only require assistance with regular, daily activities which may include transportation to doctor’s appointments, grocery shopping, or bathing. Still, others may require more steady care, depending on their disease and how far it has developed.

A person who receives senior home care services can have more private attention than someone who lives in a nursing home. In a nursing home, a partial number of personnel must attend to a number of different people with varying degrees of needs. Receiving care at home can cost less than it does in a nursing home because of equipment costs that are factored into nursing homes. The annual costs of a nursing home differ by state, but in most cases, the costs far go above and beyond the median income of many older people. Those with Medicare soon find out that it only covers a little portion of long-term care, and that treatment is limited to the sort and number of days. The people that cannot come up with the money to supplement the costs of a nursing home could want to give home care services serious thought.

The topic of elderly home care is very broad in nature and I enjoy looking at all the aspects of it. Feel free to look at my other post about the options of senior home care services for your loved ones.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chuck_Parsens

There’s No Place Like Home for Growing Old in San Diego, California

There’s No Place Like Home For Growing Old

“The stairs are getting so hard to climb.”

“Since my wife died, I just open a can of soup for dinner.”

“I’ve lived here 40 years. No other place will seem like home.”

These are common concerns for older people. And, you may share an often-heard wish—“I want to stay in my own home!” The good news is that with the right help you might be able to do just that.

Click on the link below from the National Institute on Aging to read more.  The tips there will help families know what to do first, the kinds of help available, where to start and what the costs are.  If you have any further questions, or need help with an aging loved one in the San Diego CA area, visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com.

Read more…

May is Older Americans Month-Learn More in San Diego, California

Older Americans Month 2010

Age Strong! Live Long!

May is Older Americans Month—a tradition dating back to 1963 to honor the legacies and ongoing contributions of older Americans and support them as they enter the next stage in life.

This year’s Older Americans Month theme—Age Strong! Live Long!—recognizes the diversity and vitality of today’s older Americans who span three generations. They have lived through wars and hard times, as well as periods of unprecedented prosperity. They pioneered new technologies in medicine, communications, and industry while spearheading a cultural revolution that won equal rights for minorities, women, and disabled Americans.

These remarkable achievements demonstrate the strength and character of older Americans, and underscore the debt of gratitude we owe to the generations that have given our society so much. But the contributions of older Americans are not only in the past.

Older Americans are living longer and are more active than ever before. And with the aging of the baby boomer generation—the largest in our nation’s history—America’s senior population is expected to number 71.5 million by 2030.

While keeping the growing population of older Americans healthy and active will increase the demand for senior services, what is remarkable is the extent to which older Americans themselves are supporting each other. As the new generations of seniors become better educated and more financially secure than their predecessors, they are spending more time making significant contributions in their communities through civic and volunteer opportunities.

In fact, older Americans are a core component of service delivery to seniors—embodying and modeling the drive to Age Strong! Live Long! They volunteer at group meal sites and deliver food to homebound seniors; they act as escorts and provide transportation for older adults who cannot drive; they help seniors with home repair, shopping and errands; and they provide vital counseling, information and referral services. Their energy and commitment reminds all Americans—not just senior citizens and their caregivers—to do their part to enhance the quality of life for older generations.

The annual commemoration of Older Americans Month is our opportunity to recognize the contributions of older citizens and join them in providing services and support that empower the elderly. Americans of all ages and backgrounds can volunteer with programs that improve health literacy, increase access to quality health services, offer food and nutrition services, provide financial and housing counseling, sponsor social activities and community engagement, and more.

Contact your local Area Agency on Aging by visiting http://www.eldercare.gov or calling 1-800-677-1116 to find out what you can do to strengthen services for older Americans, this month and all year round.

Visit us at www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance regarding home care in the San Diego CA area.

Take Stock of Your Risk Factors During Stroke Awareness Month in San Diego, California

A major contributor of heart disease and stroke is salt!  May is Stroke Awareness Month, a great time to take stock of your risk factors.  Visit us at www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance for an aging loved one in the San Diego, California area.

Consumers’ tastes make it difficult to dash salt from diets

For years, Americans have been advised to consume less sodium, and they’ve taken that advice with a grain of salt.

Even many health-conscious consumers figured it was the least of their worries, especially compared with limiting their intake of calories, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sugar.

ANTI-SALT INITIATIVE: 16 companies pledge to cut sodium

All that changed last week when a report from the Institute of Medicine urged the government to gradually reduce the maximum amount of sodium that manufacturers and restaurants can add to foods, beverages and meals. The report put a spotlight on what doctors and nutritionists have argued is a major contributor to heart disease and stroke.

Read more at usatoday.com…