Posts Tagged ‘Elder Care San Diego California (CA)’

Can Exercise Keep San Diego CA Seniors Mentally Sharp?

A growing body of evidence links exercise and mental acuity

I do some of my best writing on the run. I mean literally. When the words won’t come, when the syntax doesn’t feel right, when I just can’t figure out what angle to take on a column, I’ll often go for a good, hard run.

And usually it works. With the sweat pouring and lungs working overtime, the mental fog lifts. I make connections I hadn’t seen earlier. How to be clear becomes, well, a little more clear.

If you work out routinely, I bet you’ve had the same experience. Three researchers I interviewed for this story say they have achieved it regularly, on a treadmill, on outdoor runs and on a bicycle, respectively. A couple of studies seem to confirm it.

The tantalizing question for those of us in middle age and beyond (I am 52) is whether this short-term cognitive benefit can be replicated over the long haul. Can exercise help keep our minds sharp? And if so, can it help delay or prevent the truly terrifying mental deterioration of dementia, most commonly seen as Alzheimer’s disease?

Researchers studying both animals and humans increasingly say the answer is yes.

Read more…

Visit us at www.ageadvantagsandiego.com for help with an aging loved one in the area.

Activities for Parents with Dementia in San Diego, California

My Elderly Parent Has Dementia: What Activities Can We Do Together?

by Emilee Seltzer

Caregivers for the elderly with dementia often find that coming up with activities for the elder can require much thought and effort. But they are vital to your parent’s health and well-being. Creating activities can really be quite simple if you follow some general guidelines.

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For help with an aging loved one in the San Diego area, visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com.

Caring for an Alzheimer’s Patient in San Diego, California

Here is a great article from agingcare.com for anyone who has a friend or family member who may be suffering with Alzheimer’s.   If you have questions, or need help for a senior loved one in the area, visit us at www.ageadvantagesandiego.com.

‘Tough Love’ – Caregiving For Alzheimer’s Patients

It is an understatement to say that taking care of a loved one who is stricken with Alzheimer’s Disease, also known as ‘AD’, is a tough job.

(AD is an illness which results in the progressive loss of brain nerve cells, leading to a gradual decline of mental functions and is the most common cause of dementia).

AD is considered to be among the most stressful illness a family caregiver can face and one of the most physically and mentally exhausting situations in a person’s life.

Continue reading HERE

The Benefits of Senior Home Care in San Diego, California

Here is a great article about the many benefits of home care for an aging senior.  For help with an aging loved one in the San Diego CA area, visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com.

Senior Home Care Services Has Many Benefits Over a Nursing Home

By Chuck Parsens

As the United States people age, the focus on the number of looked for services will have to line up with the quality of the care rendered. For many years a spotlight has been placed on how well residents who reside in a nursing home are treated. Some understand that the level of care an individual obtains is dependent on how much family members are involved. Some mature children have trouble with placing their senior parents in a nursing home because of the negative press. Price is also a part in making this choice. An alternative to nursing homes is senior home care services, which allow a person to stay put in their home and receive the level of care that they will need.

Along with determining the price and care, the types of elderly home care services are chosen based on an individual’s situation. Insurance companies have sought ways to trim down the costs of hospitalization and therapy services, which has opened the door for service providers who concentrate in giving these services at an individual’s home. This reduces health care costs and allows an older adult to remain in their homes. The home care landscape has grown into a cutthroat business, giving greater options for people to choose from.

The advantages of having home care services rather than staying in a nursing home cannot be miscalculated. The intellectual portion of being able to keep some level of liberty can go a long way to improving the excellence of life for numerous elder adults. Most elderly only require assistance with regular, daily activities which may include transportation to doctor’s appointments, grocery shopping, or bathing. Still, others may require more steady care, depending on their disease and how far it has developed.

A person who receives senior home care services can have more private attention than someone who lives in a nursing home. In a nursing home, a partial number of personnel must attend to a number of different people with varying degrees of needs. Receiving care at home can cost less than it does in a nursing home because of equipment costs that are factored into nursing homes. The annual costs of a nursing home differ by state, but in most cases, the costs far go above and beyond the median income of many older people. Those with Medicare soon find out that it only covers a little portion of long-term care, and that treatment is limited to the sort and number of days. The people that cannot come up with the money to supplement the costs of a nursing home could want to give home care services serious thought.

The topic of elderly home care is very broad in nature and I enjoy looking at all the aspects of it. Feel free to look at my other post about the options of senior home care services for your loved ones.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chuck_Parsens

There’s No Place Like Home for Growing Old in San Diego, California

There’s No Place Like Home For Growing Old

“The stairs are getting so hard to climb.”

“Since my wife died, I just open a can of soup for dinner.”

“I’ve lived here 40 years. No other place will seem like home.”

These are common concerns for older people. And, you may share an often-heard wish—“I want to stay in my own home!” The good news is that with the right help you might be able to do just that.

Click on the link below from the National Institute on Aging to read more.  The tips there will help families know what to do first, the kinds of help available, where to start and what the costs are.  If you have any further questions, or need help with an aging loved one in the San Diego CA area, visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com.

Read more…

May is Older Americans Month-Learn More in San Diego, California

Older Americans Month 2010

Age Strong! Live Long!

May is Older Americans Month—a tradition dating back to 1963 to honor the legacies and ongoing contributions of older Americans and support them as they enter the next stage in life.

This year’s Older Americans Month theme—Age Strong! Live Long!—recognizes the diversity and vitality of today’s older Americans who span three generations. They have lived through wars and hard times, as well as periods of unprecedented prosperity. They pioneered new technologies in medicine, communications, and industry while spearheading a cultural revolution that won equal rights for minorities, women, and disabled Americans.

These remarkable achievements demonstrate the strength and character of older Americans, and underscore the debt of gratitude we owe to the generations that have given our society so much. But the contributions of older Americans are not only in the past.

Older Americans are living longer and are more active than ever before. And with the aging of the baby boomer generation—the largest in our nation’s history—America’s senior population is expected to number 71.5 million by 2030.

While keeping the growing population of older Americans healthy and active will increase the demand for senior services, what is remarkable is the extent to which older Americans themselves are supporting each other. As the new generations of seniors become better educated and more financially secure than their predecessors, they are spending more time making significant contributions in their communities through civic and volunteer opportunities.

In fact, older Americans are a core component of service delivery to seniors—embodying and modeling the drive to Age Strong! Live Long! They volunteer at group meal sites and deliver food to homebound seniors; they act as escorts and provide transportation for older adults who cannot drive; they help seniors with home repair, shopping and errands; and they provide vital counseling, information and referral services. Their energy and commitment reminds all Americans—not just senior citizens and their caregivers—to do their part to enhance the quality of life for older generations.

The annual commemoration of Older Americans Month is our opportunity to recognize the contributions of older citizens and join them in providing services and support that empower the elderly. Americans of all ages and backgrounds can volunteer with programs that improve health literacy, increase access to quality health services, offer food and nutrition services, provide financial and housing counseling, sponsor social activities and community engagement, and more.

Contact your local Area Agency on Aging by visiting http://www.eldercare.gov or calling 1-800-677-1116 to find out what you can do to strengthen services for older Americans, this month and all year round.

Visit us at www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance regarding home care in the San Diego CA area.

Take Stock of Your Risk Factors During Stroke Awareness Month in San Diego, California

A major contributor of heart disease and stroke is salt!  May is Stroke Awareness Month, a great time to take stock of your risk factors.  Visit us at www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance for an aging loved one in the San Diego, California area.

Consumers’ tastes make it difficult to dash salt from diets

For years, Americans have been advised to consume less sodium, and they’ve taken that advice with a grain of salt.

Even many health-conscious consumers figured it was the least of their worries, especially compared with limiting their intake of calories, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sugar.

ANTI-SALT INITIATIVE: 16 companies pledge to cut sodium

All that changed last week when a report from the Institute of Medicine urged the government to gradually reduce the maximum amount of sodium that manufacturers and restaurants can add to foods, beverages and meals. The report put a spotlight on what doctors and nutritionists have argued is a major contributor to heart disease and stroke.

Read more at usatoday.com…

Understanding Memory Loss in San Diego, California

Here is a great article for anyone who is struggling with memory loss, or the memory loss of an aging loved one.  Visit us at www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance with home care for seniors in the San Diego CA area.

Understanding Memory Loss

What is memory loss?

Memory loss is something we all experience in life. We forget familiar names, we cannot remember where we left our wallets and purses the previous evening, and we can’t remember everything needed at the grocery store without having a list. This type of memory loss is perfectly normal and as we age, such mild forgetfulness may start happening more and more.

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Dementia Caregiving in San Diego, California

Here is a great article for anyone who is struggling while caring for an aging loved one with dementia.  Visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance with home care in the San Diego CA area.

Dementia Caregiving: When Nobody Appreciates You, What Can You Do?

What’s worse –- the many challenging dimensions of dementia caregiving, like losing your privacy, worrying, assisting with daily living, filling the long hours, coping with new expenses, the anticipatory grief of watching someone you love change, and family-work stress (to name, oh, a few) –- or the thanklessness of it all?

Feeling taken for granted as a caregiver is incredibly common. Surveys indicate that more than half of all caregivers do. And yes, these understandable feelings are a stressor. What also adds stress: Feeling sheepish when you want to complain about this.

Read more…

Learn What It’s Like for Your San Diego, CA Loved One With Dementia

Here is a great article I wanted to share for those who are experiencing the effects of dementia with an aging loved one.  Visit www.ageadvantagesandiego.com for information and assistance with home care in the San Diego, CA area.

What’s it Like Have Dementia?

By Frena Gray-Davidson

If you have a parent or a spouse with dementia, you probably wonder what people inside the disease feel. One thing that’s always okay is to ask them.

Dementia can be a very isolating condition. It can really affect how well people can communicate. Of course, as we all know, it certainly affects memory. It can be hard for people to even find the words or hold the thoughts they have. It makes it very hard to follow through a whole explanation about anything.

You won’t hurt a person with dementia by asking what you want to know. In fact, it might help them feel less lonely. Because of their condition, they might not be able to find you the answer you want. But that’s okay. Trying is good enough for both of you feel closer.

Five Questions People Ask About Dementia:

1. Does it hurt to have dementia?

Dementia is not a physically painful condition. It is emotionally painful, for family and for the person who has it. If you know someone with dementia who is also having head pains or other pain, it is essential to get them to a doctor for help and relief of their pain.

2. What do people with dementia think about?

Having dementia makes clear and flowing thought difficult. It is hard to be logical and rational with dementia because brain deterioration blocks the channels for clear thought.

That said, they think about their past, their family, their wants, their needs and maybe sometimes nothing much at all.

3. Do they lose all memory?

Not necessarily. Studies show that, while short-term memory becomes catastrophically bad, longterm memory may be anything from surprisingly good to very mediocre.

So a person who doesn’t remember anything about this morning may be able to tell in detail all about being young and living with their parents.

4. What does it feel like to have dementia?

From my 20 years with people with dementia, I’d say it feels frightening, lonely, confusing and full of bewilderment.

But also, just like us, they feel loving, angry, sad, anxious, grateful and add your own adjectives.

5. How can I help?

By using the qualities of patience, love, tolerance, understanding — and honesty. The best thing you can do is to be a fairly nice version of yourself and also truthful. You can say things like:

- “I hate this illness you have!”

- “I wish you were well again!”

- “It’s just not fair!”

- “I’m scared!”

You won’t hurt a person with dementia by being honest about how you feel. In fact, it might help them a lot. It might bring you back closer together. Because what you feel about their illness might well be just what they feel. Maybe they can’t find the words and you being honest might help them talk about it.

Remember, people with dementia are ill, but not necessarily fragile and breakable. So you can talk to them as if they could understand an adult conversation. You’ll soon find out if they understand or not. If they don’t understand today, they may understand tomorrow.

And it’s really okay to experiment and find what works. If you can make them laugh, you will notice that they function at a much higher thinking level for anything from about half an hour to maybe two hours.

It’s the miracle of endorphins. Use and enjoy!

Frena Gray-Davidson is a longterm Alzheimer’s caregiver and her latest book is “Alzheimer’s 911: Hope, Help and Healing for Caregivers”, available from http://www.amazon.com. Frena presents dementia seminars nationally and internationally. Go to her website at http://www.alzguide.com/ and sign up for her free monthly online newsletter for caregivers.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Frena_Gray-Davidson